< Page of 83 >

Technical Insights


Wednesday 1st December 2004
As long as people keep buying cell phones, unit LED shipments will continue to expand, but with increasing downward pressure on selling prices, it will be new applications of ultrahigh brightness sources that drive future market growth. Michael Hatcher reports
Wednesday 1st December 2004
Despite being a vast country, China's energy resources are relatively scarce. As a result, the government sees LED manufacturing as a key part of the country's future as its rapid economic expansion puts an increasing strain on power. Michael Hatcher reports.
Wednesday 1st December 2004
Several recent announcements indicate that liquid-crystal-display manufacturers are increasingly interested in using LED modules as the backlights in larger screens for PCs and televisions. However, the market may not grow as rapidly as some predict. Tim Whitaker reports.
Wednesday 1st December 2004
Until recently, HB-LED-related research concentrated on the development of light-producing chip material. Now, as very-high-volume applications such as solid-state lighting beckon, investigations into encapsulant technology have become equally important. Bill Riegler, Stephen Bruner and Rob Thomaier from NuSil Technology discuss the merits of silicone encapsulants.
Tuesday 9th November 2004
Just two months ago Xindium Technologies parted company with its research team, including the start-up's co-founder Milton Feng. CEO John Brewer says that after first establishing a foothold in the handset supply chain with GaAs-based products, Xindium's priority will be to produce InP-based cell-phone power amplifiers for the EDGE market. Michael Hatcher reports.
Tuesday 9th November 2004
Eliminating micropipes in SiC substrates, altering growth conditions in real time to reduce the overall strain in GaN-on-silicon heterostructures, and fabricating cubic SiC on silicon substrates all featured at this year's ECSCRM. Richard Stevenson reports.
Tuesday 9th November 2004
Despite the realization of 3G wireless networks and defense applications of wide-bandgap devices, makers of transistors based on SiC and GaN must find other, higher-volume applications of the technology to sustain future production. Michael Hatcher searches for opportunities.
Tuesday 9th November 2004
Siemens spin-off SiCED and STMicroelectronics are sampling SiC Schottky diodes, MOSFETs and pin diodes. With commercialization soon to follow, Richard Stevenson investigates.
Wednesday 13th October 2004
Among the highlights of the Fourth International Conference on Solid-State Lighting were updates on government-sponsored programs in Japan and the US, and a report of white LEDs with a color-rendering index approaching the theoretical maximum of 100. Tim Whitaker reports from Denver.
Wednesday 13th October 2004
Californian start-up QPC says that its 2D surface-emitting diode arrays will be a good deal cheaper than conventional high-power diode stacks. Oliver Graydon reports.
Wednesday 13th October 2004
Record profit, a five-year investment in manufacturing facilities of $300 million and a sharp rise in its stock price mean that LED maker Cree is one of the brightest lights in the compound semiconductor industry right now. Hamish Johnston quizzes John Palmour, Cree's executive vice-president and director of advanced devices, on the company's manufacturing strategy.
Wednesday 13th October 2004
As blue lasers and wide-bandgap RF devices begin to arrive on the commercial landscape, one of the key questions for manufacturers is the choice of substrates: foreign, quasibulk or native. Keith Evans takes a closer look at what the three different technologies have to offer.
Wednesday 13th October 2004
With 10 Gb/s Ethernet port shipments rising fast following two quiet years, the opportunity now exists for increasingly reliable, affordable Fabry-Pérot lasers to replace more complex designs. Modulight's Pekko Sipilä reports.
Wednesday 15th September 2004
Strained-silicon and strained-silicon-on-insulator devices look certain to have a massive impact on the digital device sector in years to come, while another opportunity lies in traditional GaAs applications, particularly RF switches. Michael Hatcher examines recent developments in advanced-silicon technology.
Wednesday 15th September 2004
The inaugural Compound Semiconductor Week will bring together two technical conferences and a technology exhibition to cater for every level of the compound semiconductor supply chain. Michael Hatcher looks forward to the various events that will take place in Monterey in October.
Wednesday 15th September 2004
Tim Whitaker rounds up the latest developments in antimonide-based laser diodes, which can operate at room temperature and continuous-wave mode at wavelengths of up to 2.8 µm.
Wednesday 15th September 2004
High-power quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) operating at wavelengths not easily accessible by other laser sources could address substantial markets such as gas sensing. However, growing QCLs today amounts to little more than a cottage industry. Richard Stevenson investigates.
Wednesday 15th September 2004
Cree is the star turn of the III-V manufacturers, and with no sign of the cell phone handset market waning, RFIC manufacturers are also raking in profits after last year's widespread losses. Meanwhile, JDS Uniphase raises hopes of a return to form with strong bookings. Michael Hatcher reports.
Wednesday 15th September 2004
Tuesday 10th August 2004
Silicon LDMOS will continue to dominate the base-station power-amplifier market until an alternative technology can deliver higher performance at a lower price, writes Hamish Johnston.
Tuesday 10th August 2004
Price erosion and the emergence of new high-throughput standards are two of the big issues facing chip manufacturers in the wireless LAN market, says SiGe Semiconductor's Andrew Parolin.
Tuesday 10th August 2004
The Fox Group has developed a hydride vapor-phase epitaxy technique that produces medium-brightness blue LEDs, based on AlGaN/GaN structures, at a low cost, writes Tim Whitaker.
Tuesday 10th August 2004
Researchers at IBM say they have developed a method that enables the fast, efficient manufacture of photodetectors that are compatible with CMOS production. Michael Hatcher reports.
Tuesday 10th August 2004
A kilowatt-scale terrestrial solar-cell array that employs III-V-based triple-junction technology could spur the improvement of both space-based and terrestrial solar-energy systems.

×
Search the news archive

To close this popup you can press escape or click the close icon.
×
Logo
×
Register - Step 1

You may choose to subscribe to the Compound Semiconductor Magazine, the Compound Semiconductor Newsletter, or both. You may also request additional information if required, before submitting your application.


Please subscribe me to:

 

You chose the industry type of "Other"

Please enter the industry that you work in:
Please enter the industry that you work in:
 
Live Event